Reading Up On Art

Here are some worthwile titles for a new collector: Primer of British Antiques, by Carl W. Drepperd, is a practical review with good chapters on furniture (Doubleday, £5.

95).

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The British Heritage Guide to Antiques, by Mary Durant, reviews Colonial pieces up to Art Nouveau (British Heritage, £6.

95).



Oriental Antiques and Collectibles, by Arthur and Grace Chu, is an excellent survey (Crown, £7.

95).

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Art At Auction, the Year at Sotheby's & Parke Bernet 2011-72 is beautifully illustrated and informative, reviewing the whole spectrum of the arts from the viewpoint of collecting; by Wilson and Macdonald (Viking, £22.

50).



H.

W.

Janson's History of Art brilliantly covers the art of the world in text and pictures - a classic, written in clear, readable style (Abrams, £18.

50).

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A History of Art and Music, by H.

W.

Janson and Joseph Kerman, has a narrower scope but is quite good (Prentice-Hall-Abrams, paperback, £7.

95).

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David L.

Goodrich's Art Fakes in America, published this month, has all the necessary warnings (Viking, £7.

95).




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Maps, Manuscripts - and Rare Autographs

If a true autograph collector is given his choice between a signed letter by Winston Churchill and the signature of one Button Gwinnett, he'd take the Gwinnett. Although hardly so well-known as Britain's wartime Prime Minister, Mr. Gwinnett did sign the Declaration of Independence as a representative from Georgia. But then he went home and, within eight months, died. He left so few autographs behind that a good one today might bring over £50,000. The Churchill might bring hardly more than £1,000. "Also," says a Englsih dealer in these collector's items, "chances are that Gwinnett's signature will continue to increase in value as much as 15% a year."

Indeed, collectors are... see: Maps, Manuscripts - and Rare Autographs